Twin Peaks: Richard’s Dream

The finale of Twin Peaks: The Return landed this week, and as we all should have expected, there was no predicting what happened. I’m very into what that episode was doing, and I’m glad of it, because the frustration those who didn’t vibe with it seem to have sounds painful to say the least. Even as a fan of it, I feel like I’m reeling from a shocking blow; exhausted, but at the same time invigorated by it.

There are plethora of interpretations and analysis to be had. You can find my complete recap of Part 17 and 18 here, but I still had some more thoughts to sort out. There is so much to unpack that I don’t think it is about finding the right way out of a maze (it rarely is with David Lynch). But there is one theory that is going around that I want to talk about: the idea that it was all a dream. More accurately, I want to talk about exactly why this dream/reality dynamic works so well in Part 18, and why that sensation is deliberate, whether or not it is the “true” explanation for it all (a notion that I don’t buy).

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If there’s one thing most of us can relate to, it’s the feeling of waking from a dream. Much like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, a favourite of the director’s, we awake to the world we had left, and see that the entire experience was not what we believed it was even seconds before. There is a texture to the world that dreams don’t quite replicate, a level of detail that we don’t realise was missing until we wake from the dream. Continue reading →

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Death Note Review

There are plenty of people out there who can more authoritatively and comprehensively address the issue of whitewashing in this adaptation of a uniquely Japanese story. But as a fan of both the manga and the anime on which this film is based, I believe that Death Note offers the chance to explore elements of modern America rarely touched on.

In this context, to deal with the smirking certainty of a teenager who remotely doles out vengeance by his own distorted moral code is to get into the mindset of the internet’s own ugly habits of anonymous trolling, abuse, and doxxing. Continue reading →

David Lynch’s Best Soundtrack Moments

Music is a big part of David Lynch’s work, from the eerie soundscapes of his early films to his own studio releases. As his career continued and full length feature films became a rarer sight, he began to make his own music—and now has five albums and a record label to his name.

Twin Peaks‘ season 3 revival looks to include more music than ever, with appearances by Trent Reznor, Sky Ferreira, Eddie Vedder, Sharon Van Etten as well as Lynch alumni Rebekah Del Rio and Julee Cruise. Continue reading →

Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2 Review

Ayesha, High Priestess of The Sovereign sits on an opulent throne, boasting of the perfect evolutionary state reached by her species. The Sovereign are covered in gold, from their clothing and skin all the way down to their eyes.

In sharp contrast to the supercilious society and their conceited leader stands the Guardians of the Galaxy, a damaged group of misfits barely keeping it together. It’s one thing to create an ensemble as engaging as this, but it’s another to know where to place them.

Lucky for us, James Gunn knows exactly what he’s doing. Continue reading →

Bits and Pieces #2

Humanity and Iconicity in the Captain America Trilogy

The following is a piece I wrote for Audiences Everywhere as part of a feature they ran in March. The third month of this year is trilogy month for AE, with various interesting pieces being written about different three-film sagas and thematic trilogies, from the original Star Wars series to John Carpenter’s apocalypse trilogy. Here’s mine, articulating some thoughts I’ve had about Steve Roger’s relationship with his own symbolism across the three Captain America movies.


Iconicity is the relationship of similarity between the two sides of a symbol—its form and its meaning. The closer the form and meaning are to one another, the more memorable the symbol is likely to be. An iconic symbol is one whose form resembles its meaning in some way; the opposite of this iconicity is arbitrariness.

The red and white stripes, star, and ‘A’ of Captain America’s costume is pretty clear as to what it represents, but the man is less clear. Part of the difficulty of communication and judgement through language is the physical world’s resistance to being reduced to the same rules. The costume can be evaluated by this standard, but with a man wearing it, humanity will often fail to settle between the lines that are drawn in linguistics. Continue reading →

Man Down Review

A fired-up Shia LaBeouf tries and fails to salvage this muddled war drama.


An assembly of soldiers wade through the shallows of the sea, approaching the forested coast with guns in hand. One laughs as he takes in the scenery. “Fucking beautiful!” he says. Yet the image Man Down presents is of a world drained of colour – the film’s pallid hue inspiring lethargy rather than awe. It could be that Dito Montiel’s ambitious psychological thriller is not what it thinks it is.

Read the full review at Little White Lies